Level  

3


Pupils explore ideas in different ways, collecting information and practical resources in order to make informed choices about their work. They investigate and use the qualities of materials and processes to develop their own practical skills and communicate their ideas and meanings. They describe the work of others commenting on the ideas and purposes that they encounter. They use this to adapt and improve aspects of their own work when making images and artefacts for different purposes.
 

4

Pupils use a variety of approaches to explore and experiment with ideas, information and resources in order to develop their intentions. They investigate and develop a range of practical skills and use the qualities of materials and processes purposefully to suit their intentions when designing and making. They compare and comment on differing ideas, methods and approaches used by artists, craftspeople and designers, relating these to the contexts in which the work was made. They discuss their own work and that of others and consider how they might adapt and refine their ideas, skills and processes. 

5

Pupils take some creative risks when exploring, experimenting and responding to ideas and selecting information and resources in order to develop their work. When designing and making, they develop and use their technical knowledge and skills to manipulate the qualities of materials, processes and the formal elements appropriately. They consider and discuss the ideas, methods and approaches that are used by artists, craftspeople and designers, relating these to both context and purpose. They evaluate their own work and that of others, reflecting on their own view of its purpose and meaning. They are able to adapt and refine their ideas, processes and intentions.
 

6

Pupils accept creative risks, exploring and experimenting with ideas independently and inventively and using a range of appropriate resources imaginatively to develop, design and make work. They apply their technical knowledge and skills to realise their intentions, using the qualities of materials, processes and the formal elements effectively. They interpret and explain how ideas and meanings are conveyed by artists, craftspeople and designers, recognising the varied characteristics of different historical, social and cultural contexts. They provide a reasoned evaluation of the purpose and meaning of their own work and that of others. They use their critical understanding to develop their own views and practice.

7

Pupils learn from taking creative risks that help them to form and develop their ideas and to create purposeful, imaginative work with some originality. They demonstrate confident understanding and use of materials, processes and the formal elements, combining these thoughtfully to realise their intentions. They analyse and comment on their own and others’ work, appreciating how codes and conventions are used to express ideas in different genres, styles and traditions. They explain how and why their understanding of the work of others
 

8

Pupils develop, express and realise ideas in often original ways, confidently exploiting what they learn from taking creative risks and from their understanding of creative processes. They exploit the potential of materials and processes independently, making both intuitive and analytical judgements to develop and realise their intentions. They analyse, engage with, and question critically aspects of their own and others’ work, identifying how beliefs, values and meanings are expressed and shared. They confidently express reasoned judgements about their own work and that of others, demonstrating analytical, critical and contextual understanding.

Exceptional Performance

Pupils are in command of their creative practice, recognising and using a variety of strategies to develop ideas that are personal, original and imaginative. They use the differing qualities and potential of materials and processes with deliberation and maturity in order to create work that successfully fulfils their intentions. They critically engage with their own and others’ work, identifying why ideas and meanings are subject to different interpretations and using their understanding to extend their thinking and practical work. They extend their ideas and sustain their investigations by responding to new possibilities and meanings. They communicate their own ideas, insights and views.

   

Level

Skills and Knowledge.

4

Students can state and explain their own opinion and show that they understand views and opinions opposite to their own. They can make informed contributions to a debate and can work in a group to plan and take part in a project that addresses a citizenship Issue. Students evaluate the impact of Citizenship issues on themselves and others and can use a range of sources to find out about topical and controversial issues. 

Students can ask research questions to begin exploring these issues and show that they can appreciate that there are many diverse groups and communities in the UK and the wider world and use this understanding to explore the communities they belong to. 
Students explore a range of sources of information to engage with topical and controversial issues, including where rights compete and conflict. 

They begin to explain different ways in which people can participate in democracy through individual and collective actions Students show understanding of democracy by making connections with their knowledge and experience of representation and taking action in the local community. They show an understanding of the need for rules and laws and show an understanding of how they can change things in communities and wider society. They can describe why societies have money and can explain how a simple budget works.
 

5

Students can discuss and debate topical and controversial issues. Students can state their own opinions with clear explanation of their arguments and show understanding of opinions different to their own. Students can work with others to evaluate activities that will make a difference to others and can use different sources of information to explore a range of opinions and draw their own conclusions. Students can explain the impact of activities on the community. They show an understanding of how citizens improve their own communities. Students can identify the contributions of different cultures and communities to society and describe ways in which the UK is interconnected with the wider world. Students discuss and debate topical and controversial issues including those where rights are in conflict and need to be balanced. Students consider what is fair and unfair to different groups involved and make reference to relevant national, European and international dimensions of the issues. Students can work with others to evaluate activities that will make a difference to others and can use different sources of information to explore a range of opinions and draw their own conclusions.

Students can explain the impact of activities on the community. They show an understanding of how citizens improve their own communities. Students can identify the contributions of different cultures and communities to society and describe ways in which the UK is interconnected with the wider world. Students discuss and debate topical and controversial issues including those where rights are in conflict and need to be balanced. Students consider what is fair and unfair to different groups involved and make reference to relevant national, European and international dimensions of the issues.

6

Pupils take some creative risks when exploring, experimenting and responding to ideas and selecting information and resources in order to develop their work. When designing and making, they develop and use their technical knowledge and skills to manipulate the qualities of materials, processes and the formal elements appropriately. They consider and discuss the ideas, methods and approaches that are used by artists, craftspeople and designers, relating these to both context and purpose. They evaluate their own work and that of others, reflecting on their own view of its purpose and meaning. They are able to adapt and refine their ideas, processes and intentions.Students can use information to present a convincing argument and give reasons for their views .They are able to show a number of different views and ideas.  Students can show they can challenge assumptions and ideas. Students negotiate their role in a group and they can develop a plan for a course of action decided on by the group. Students describe appropriate research methods and can evaluate sources for validity and bias. Students reflect on the extent of their success in achieving an improvement or influence in the community. They are able to explain how communities can work together to develop and improve their lives. They are able to give ideas of further developments for long term impacts and suggest what they might do next.

Students can use a range of research strategies to describe how a successful society operates. Students can describe how citizens can act together to solve problems and contribute to society and reflect on the success of their ideas in achieving influence or improving communities. Students also suggest ways of taking the project further in the future. Students show understanding of the diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the UK and can explain and evaluate the need for mutual respect and understanding. Students consider a range of scenarios (from local to global) where there are inequalities and explain how different kinds of rights need to be protected, supported and balanced. Students begin to make comparisons between the UK system of democratic parliamentary government and those systems in different parts of the world. They can describe the different roles of a judiciary and a free press.

Students show understanding of interdependence, describing interconnections between people and their actions in the UK, Europe and the wider world. Students explain and evaluate the need for rules and laws .They are able to explain the importance of human rights and international law giving relevant and topical examples. They can explain the difference between income and expenditure, credit and debt, insurance, savings and pensions. They can describe financial products and services. They can explain how public money is raised and spent.

7

Students state their own opinion and show that they are aware of a range of opinions on topical and controversial issues. Students take part in an informed debate and can argue points well including those they don’t agree with. Students understand the different ways in which a citizen can contribute to the improvement of their community .They recognise the value of participating actively in volunteering and are able to make a difference through their own actions.

Students question assumptions and their own views after examining relevant evidence. Students are able to analyse the reasons for diversity in the make-up of UK society and explain how it changes over time. Students weigh up and assess the implications of situations where an individual’s or group’s rights and obligations are contested. They are able to evaluate how the law can help solve complex problems. Students begin to evaluate the actions citizens can take in democratic and electoral processes to influence decisions locally, nationally and beyond. 

They are able to critically evaluate different forms of government. Students are able to evaluate different approaches to human rights and evaluate the role played by international law giving relevant and topical examples. They can analyse the difference between income and expenditure, credit and debt, insurance, savings and pensions and work through problems linked to these issues suggesting solutions. They can evaluate the value of different financial products and services. They can analyse how public money is raised and spent and make conclusions about how this should be changed in different circumstance.

   

Level  

1


Pupils generate ideas for purposeful designs and recognise characteristics of familiar products. They show that, with help, they can create products for a use and purpose, using their practical ideas. They use models, pictures and words to describe what they want to do. They explain what they are making and which tools they are using. They use tools and manipulate materials and ingredients with help, where needed. They talk about their own and other people’s work in simple terms and describe how a product works.
 

2

Pupils generate ideas based on their investigations of products. They use models, pictures and words to describe their designs. They plan what to do next based on their experience of working with materials and components. They select appropriate tools, techniques and materials, explaining their choices. They assemble, join and combine materials, ingredients and components in a variety of ways to make functional products. They recognise what they have done well and suggest things they could do better in the future.

3

Pupils generate ideas and recognise that their designs have to meet a range of different needs and users. They clarify ideas when asked and use words, labelled sketches and models to communicate the details of their designs. They think ahead about the order of their work and make realistic plans for achieving their aims. They choose appropriate tools, equipment, components, techniques and ingredients to make their functional products. They apply their knowledge and understanding of the nature of materials to cut, shape and join them with some accuracy. After reflecting on the design and make process and their products, they identify some improvements.    

4

Pupils generate ideas by collecting and using information. They take users’ views about aesthetic and technical issues into account as they respond to briefs. They communicate alternative ideas using words, labelled sketches and models, showing that they are aware of constraints. They use some ideas from others’ designing to inform their own work. They produce step-by-step plans and then select and work with a range of tools and equipment. They apply their knowledge and understanding of materials, ingredients and components, and work with them with some accuracy, paying attention to quality of finish and to function. They identify what is working well and what could be improved to overcome technical problems. They reflect on their designs as they develop, recognising the significance of knowledge and previous experience.

 

5

Pupils develop ideas by drawing on and using various sources of information. They clarify their ideas through discussion, drawing and modelling, showing understanding of aesthetic and economic dimensions. They respond to briefs showing understanding of how culture and society are reflected in familiar products when developing and communicating their own ideas. They show that they are aware of constraints as they apply knowledge and understanding of materials, ingredients and techniques. They use understanding of others’ designing as they develop their work. They work from their own detailed plans, modifying them where appropriate. They work with a range of tools, materials, ingredients, equipment, components and processes with some precision. They check their work as it develops, solve technical problems and show some evidence of creativity as they modify their approach in the light of progress. They test and evaluate their products, showing that they understand the situations in which the products will function.

6

Pupils draw on and use a range of sources of information, and show that they understand the form and function of familiar products as they develop and model ideas. They respond creatively to briefs, exploring and testing their design thinking. They develop detailed criteria for their products and use these to explore proposals. They apply their knowledge and understanding by responding to several aspects of the problem. They recognise the significance of others’ designing and modify their approaches accordingly. They produce plans that outline alternative methods of making progress. They work with a range of tools, materials, ingredients, equipment, components and processes, showing that they understand their characteristics. They check their work as it develops and solve technical problems by modifying their approach in the light of progress. They evaluate how effectively they have used information sources, using the results of their research to inform their judgements when developing products. They evaluate their products as they are being used and identify ways of improving them.

 

7


Pupils use a wide range of appropriate sources of information when developing and modelling ideas. They investigate form, function and production processes as they respond creatively to briefs. They apply their knowledge and understanding, recognising the different needs of a range of users, and search for trends and patterns in existing solutions as they develop fully realistic products. They use their understanding of others’ designing to inform their own as they communicate creative ideas. They produce plans that predict the time needed to carry out the main stages of making products. They work with a range of tools, materials, ingredients, equipment, components and processes, taking full account of their characteristics. They adapt their methods of manufacture to changing circumstances as they solve technical problems, providing a sound explanation for any change from the design proposal. They select appropriate techniques to evaluate how their products would perform when used and modify their products in the light of this evaluation to improve their performance.
 
 

8


Pupils use a range of strategies to fully develop and model appropriate ideas, responding to information they have identified. They identify conflicting demands on a product and respond creatively to briefs, suggesting ways forward and explaining how their ideas address these demands. When applying knowledge they make decisions on materials, ingredients and techniques based on their understanding of physical properties and working characteristics. They use their understanding of others’ designing by reinterpreting and applying learning in new contexts. They organise their work so that they can carry out processes accurately and consistently, and use tools, equipment, materials, ingredients and components with precision. They use accurate testing to inform their judgements when solving technical problems. They identify a broad range of criteria for evaluating their products, clearly relating their findings to environmental, ethical, and social and cultural dimensions.
 

Exceptional Performance

Exceptional Performance Pupils seek out information to help their design thinking. They recognise how products contribute to the lifestyle and choices of a variety of client groups as they develop and model ideas in an innovative way. Responding creatively to briefs, they are discriminating in their selection and use of information sources to support their work.

They interpret and apply knowledge and understanding creatively in new design contexts and communicate ideas in new or unexpected ways. They use understanding of others’ designing in innovative ways. They work with tools, equipment, materials, ingredients and components to a high degree of precision. They make products that are reliable and robust and that fully meet the quality requirements given in the design proposal. They reflect critically and effectively throughout designing and making processes.

 

 

   

Level

Skills And Knowledge.

1

Pupils work in a range of groups.  They can respond appropriately to stimuli. Pupils engage in making pieces of drama alone and in groups.  On occasion, pupils will share their work with others.  They will evaluate the work of others on a simple level by stating preferences.

2

 

Pupils begin to work confidently in a range of groups and situations.  On occasions they are able to respond simply to a range of stimuli.  Pupils engage in making pieces of drama and sometimes show awareness of the needs of their audience.  Pupils will regularly share their work confidently with others.  They will evaluate the work of others on a simple level by stating preferences.

 

3

 

Pupils work confidently in a range of groups and situations.  They are able to respond simply to a range of stimuli.  Pupils work with focus to make pieces of drama and are aware of the need to adapt their work to the needs of an audience for performance.  They will evaluate the work of others on a simple level, stating preferences and occasionally expanding on these.

 

4

 

Pupils work confidently in a range of familiar and unfamiliar groups and situations. They are able to respond thoughtfully to a range of stimuli.  Pupils work with clear concentration to make pieces of drama and begin to adapt their work to the needs of an audience for performance.  They will evaluate their own work and that of others by stating preferences and expanding on these using the vocabulary of drama.

 

 

5


Pupils work confidently in a range of familiar and unfamiliar groups and situations, suggesting ideas and leading discussions.  They are able to respond thoughtfully to a range of stimuli.  Pupils work with clear concentration to make pieces of drama.  Pupils use their performance skills to engage the interest of the audience.  They will evaluate their own work and that of others through the language of drama, showing understanding of how character, atmosphere and tension are created.
 
 

6


Pupils work confidently in a wide range of groups and situations, leading discussions and building on other ideas.  They are able to respond imaginatively to an increasing range of stimuli.  Pupils work with clear concentration and some imagination to make pieces of drama.  Pupils use their performance skills to engage the interest of the audience through their accuracy and expression.  They will evaluate their own work and that of others through the language of drama, showing simple analysis of how character, atmosphere and tension are created.
 
 

7


Pupils work confidently in all groups and situations, displaying strong group work skills.  They respond imaginatively to an increasing range of stimuli.  Pupils work with concentration and imagination to make pieces of drama.  Pupils use their performance skills and the sequencing of events and scenes to engage and sustain the interest of the audience.  They will evaluate their own work and that of others through the language of drama, using increasingly complex analysis of how character, atmosphere and tension are created.
 
 

8


Pupils work confidently in all groups and situations, displaying strong group work skills.  They respond imaginatively to a wide range of stimuli.  Pupils work with concentration and imagination to make original pieces of drama.  Pupils select and use performance skills and the sequencing of events and scenes to engage and sustain the interest of the audience.  They will evaluate their own work and that of others through the language of drama, using increasingly complex analysis of how character, atmosphere and tension are created through movement, dialogue and pace.
 

Exceptional Performance


Pupils initiate and sustain a group response to a wide range of stimuli.  They select appropriate conventions and Drama forms for the creation of original pieces of Drama.  Performance skills are imaginatively controlled and employed to engage and affect the audience.  Pupils take a leading role in the evaluation of their own and others work, demonstrating clear understanding of how the drama has been shaped and realised through sophisticated use of the language of Drama.
 
 
 

Level

    

3

Speaking & Listening

Pupils can talk and listen confidently.  In discussion they can show an understanding of the main points and are increasingly aware of the main points.

Reading

Pupils can read accurately and fluently, understanding the main point of and purpose of the text.  They are able to demonstrate straightforward inference and are aware of the basic features of a text’s organisation.  Simple connections between texts are made and pupils can recognise some features of context

Writing

Writing is organised, imaginative and clear.  Full stops, capital letters and question marks are used correctly and pupils are beginning to use commas, particularly in narrative writing.  Ideas are appropriate and expressed in some detail.

4

Speaking & Listening

Pupils talk and listen with confidence in a range of contexts.  Pupils show an ability to adapt their talk to purpose and to describe and convey their ideas and opinions clearly.  Pupils use some features of standard English appropriately.

Reading

Pupils are able to respond to a range of challenging texts, showing understanding of significant ideas and characters.  Inferences are made, drawing on different parts of the text.  Pupils are able to identify some structural choices with simple comment and recognise a range of poetic techniques.

Writing

Pupils’ writing is lively and thoughtful in a range of forms; they are able to sustain and develop ideas in interesting ways, using vocabulary which is often adventurous.  Pupils use a variety of sentence lengths and structures in their writing to provide clarity and emphasis and writing is organised into paragraphs to help organise a text.  Spelling of polysyllabic words is generally accurate, as is punctuation within sentences.  Handwriting is fluent, cursive and legible.

5

Speaking & Listening

Pupils are able to develop their ideas thoughtfully and talk with confidence in a range of contexts.  They begin to vary their expression and vocabulary and are increasingly competent when using standard English.

Reading

Pupils show understanding of a range of challenging, whole texts, developing explanation of inferred meaning across the text.  Pupils can explain how the contexts in which a text was written contribute to meaning and they are able to explain similarities and differences between texts with some explanation.  Critical reading of a text allows a pupil to explain how language, structure and organisational features shape meaning.  Pupils also have a detailed understanding of a range of poetic devices and conventions and are able to explain their effectiveness in a poem.

Writing

Pupils’ writing is varied, interesting and sustained.  They are able to convey meaning clearly in a range of forms.  Vocabulary is imaginative and words are used precisely.  Pupils are able to structure their writing clearly in appropriate paragraphs and with accurate and confident use of a range of vocabulary.  Spelling of grammatical function words, almost all inflected words, most derivational suffixes and prefixes and most content / lexical words is accurate.  Handwriting is cursive, clear and fluent.

6

Speaking & Listening

Pupils’ talk actively engages the listener through the liveliness of both vocabulary and expression.  They take an active role in discussions, taking different roles and showing understanding of ideas and sensitivity to others.  Standard English, along with a range of selected vocabulary, is used fluently when the context so demands.

Reading

Pupils are able to identify and comment on different layers of meaning in a range of texts.  They are able to comment on the wider implications or significance of information.  Pupils’ response is personal, and refers to aspects of language, structure and themes to justify their views.  They are also able to extend this further to explore textual conventions used by writers from different periods and how the contexts in which texts are written and read affect meaning.  Pupils are able to summarise a range of information from different sources and demonstrate a confident understanding of a range of poetic conventions.

Writing

Pupils’ writing is imaginative, convincing and fluent, showing an ability to adapt style and register to a range of forms.  Paragraph construction is conscious and it supports meaning and purpose, demonstrating a range of cohesive devices in doing so.  Technically, a wide range of punctuation is used accurately and a range of simple, complex and compound sentences are used in a controlled and confident manner, often to create specific effects.  Spelling is generally accurate throughout all writing.

7

Speaking & Listening

Pupils are confident in matching their talk to the demands of different contexts, including those that are unfamiliar.  Vocabulary is used in a precise and creative way.  When in discussion, pupils show an ability to evaluate others’ ideas when making a significant contribution to a discussion.  Standard English is used confidently when appropriate.

Reading

Pupils’ comments make connections between texts, teasing out meanings or weighing up evidence.  They show precision when selecting and applying textual reference to the point being made and their responses begin to develop some analytical or evaluative comment on writers’ purpose.  Pupils demonstrate an ability to develop precise, perceptive analysis of how language and structure are used and an appreciation of how language choices contribute to the overall effect on the reader.  In addition to this, pupils are able to articulate why some texts are particularly valued and influential and they are able to select, synthesize and compare information from a variety of sources.  In poetry, pupils show a sophisticated understanding of a range of poetic conventions and demonstrate a detailed appreciation how these have been used by the writer.

Writing

Pupils’ writing shows imaginative adaptation of a wide range of forms and conventions to suit a variety of purposes and audiences.  A well-judged or distinctive voice or point of view is sustained throughout and the level of formality required is controlled and appropriate.  Vocabulary is consistently imaginative, varied and ambitious across a range of writing.  Paragraphs are integral to meaning and purpose and information and ideas are shaped to achieve intended purpose and effect.  Sentences are judiciously deployed to achieve purpose and effect and spelling is correct throughout.
 

8

Speaking & Listening

Pupils maintain and develop their talk purposefully in a range of contexts.  Talk is appropriately structured and apt vocabulary is used alongside appropriate intonation and emphasis.  Perceptive listening enables pupils to make a sensitive contribution to discussion.  Standard English is used confidently in a range of situations.

Reading

Pupils adopt a clear critical stance to develop a coherent interpretation of a range of texts, drawing on imaginative insights and well supported by reference.  Pupils have a clear appreciation of how a text’s structure and language are used to support meaning and are able to critically evaluate the writer’s purposes and viewpoints.  Their analysis is sustained and rooted in an awareness of the novel’s context and in particular how historical and cultural context has influenced the writing.

Writing

Writing is imaginative, well controlled and creative.  It is adapted to a wide range of forms and conventions to meet varied writing challenges with distinctive personal voice and style matched to intended effect, audience and purpose.  Sentence structure is imaginative, precise and accurate, matched to intended effect.  A wide range of vocabulary is used imaginatively and with precision and spelling is correct throughout.
   

Level  

3


Pupils show their knowledge, skills and understanding in studies at a local scale. They describe and compare the physical and human features of different localities and offer explanations for the locations of some of those features. They are aware that different places may have both similar and different characteristics. They offer reasons for some of their observations and for their views and judgements about places and environments. They recognise how people seek to improve and sustain environments
 

4

Pupils show their knowledge, skills and understanding in studies of a range of places and environments at more than one scale and in different parts of the world. They begin to recognise and describe geographical patterns and to appreciate the importance of wider geographical location in understanding places. They recognise and describe physical and human processes. They begin to understand how these can change the features of places, and how these changes affect the lives and activities of people living there. They understand how people can both improve and damage the environment. They explain their own views and the views that other people hold about an environmental change. 

5

Pupils describe and begin to explain geographical patterns and physical and human processes. They describe how these processes can lead to similarities and differences in the environments of different places and in the lives of people who live there. They recognise some of the links and relationships that make places dependent on each other. They suggest explanations for the ways in which human activities cause changes to the environment and the different views people hold about them. They recognise how people try to manage environments sustainably. They can explain their own views and begin to suggest relevant geographical questions and issues. They select information and sources of evidence, suggest plausible conclusions to their investigations and present their findings both graphically and in writing.
 

6

Pupils describe and explain a range of physical and human processes and recognise that these processes interact to produce the distinctive characteristics of places. They describe ways in which physical and human processes operating at different scales create geographical patterns and lead to changes in places. They appreciate the many links and relationships that make places dependent on each other. They recognise how conflicting demands on the environment may arise and describe and compare different approaches to managing environments. They appreciate that different values and attitudes, including their own, result in different approaches that have different effects on people and places. They present investigations  in a coherent way and reach conclusions that are consistent with the evidence.

7

Pupils understand that many factors, including people's values and attitudes, influence the decisions made about places and environments, and use this understanding to explain the resulting changes. They appreciate that the environment in a place and the lives of the people who live there are affected by actions and events in other places. They recognise that human actions, including their own, may have unintended environmental consequences and that change sometimes leads to conflict. They appreciate that considerations of sustainable development affect the planning and management of environments and resources. They present well-argued summaries of their investigations and begin to reach substantiated conclusions.
 

8

Pupils begin to account for disparities in development and understand the range and complexity of factors that contribute to the quality of life in different places. They recognise the causes and consequences of environmental issues and understand a range of views about them and different approaches to tackling them. They understand how considerations of sustainable development can affect their own lives as well as the planning and management of environments and resources. They use examples to illustrate this. Drawing on their knowledge and understanding, they show independence in identifying appropriate geographical questions and issues, and in using an effective sequence of investigation. They select a wide range of skills and use them effectively and accurately. They present full and coherently argued summaries of their investigations and reach substantiated conclusions.

   

Level  

3

Show a developing understanding of chronology by the realisation that the past can be divided into different periods of time and recognise some of the similarities and differences between different historical periods and can use dates and terms. 

Show knowledge and understanding of some of the main events, people and changes studied.
 

Give a few reasons for, and results of, the main events and changes. 
Identify some of the different ways in which the past is represented. 
Use sources of information in ways that go beyond simple observations to answer questions about the past.

4

Show knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by describing some of the main events, people and periods that have been studied, identify where these fit within a chronological framework. 

Describe characteristic features of past societies and periods to identify change and continuity within and across different periods.

Identify some causes and consequences of the main events and changes. 
Identify and describe different ways in which the past has been interpreted. 
Use information as evidence to test hypotheses. 

Produce structured work, making appropriate use of dates and terms.

5

Show knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by describing events, people and some features of past societies and periods
Show awareness of where events fit within a chronological framework.

Recognise and describe the nature and extent of diversity, change and continuity, and are able to suggest relationships between causes. 

Suggest some reasons for different interpretations of the past and they begin to recognise why some events, people and changes might be judged as more historically significant than others. 

Investigate historical problems and issues and begin to ask their own questions. 
Evaluate sources to establish evidence for particular enquiries. 

Select and deploy information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to support and structure my work.

6

Show knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by beginning to analyse the nature and extent of diversity, change and continuity within and across different periods.

Explain relationships between causes. 

Explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen or been constructed. 

Explore criteria for making judgements about the historical significance of events, people and changes. 

Investigate historical problems and issues, asking and beginning to refine my own questions. 

Evaluate sources to establish relevant evidence for particular enquiries. 

Select, organise and deploy relevant information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce structured work.

7

Demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by analysing historical change and continuity, diversity and causation. 

Explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen or been constructed. 

Explain how the significance of events, people and changes has varied according to different perspectives. 

Investigate historical problems and issues, asking and refining their own questions and beginning to reflect on the process undertaken. 

Consider critically issues surrounding the origin, nature and purpose of sources. 
Select, organise and use relevant information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce well-structured work.

8

Show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history, constructing well supported analyses about historical change and continuity, diversity and causation. 
Analyse and explain a range of historical interpretations and different judgements about historical significance. 

Suggest lines of enquiry into historical problems and issues, refining their methods of investigation. 

Evaluate critically a range of sources and reach substantiated conclusions independently. 

Use historical terminology confidently, reflecting on the way in which terms can change meaning according to context. 

Produce precise and coherent work.

Exceptional Performance

Show a confident and extensive knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history. 

Use their knowledge to frame and pursue enquiries about historical change and continuity, diversity and causation, constructing well-substantiated, analytic arguments within a wide frame of historical reference. 

Analyse links between events and developments that took place in different countries and in different periods. 

Construct convincing and substantiated arguments and evaluations based on their understanding of the historical context. 

Evaluate critically a wide range of sources, reaching substantiated conclusions independently. 

Use historical terminology confidently, reflectively and critically. 

Consistently produce precise and coherent narratives, descriptions and explanations.

   



Level

 

1

Computer Science

Students understand what an algorithm is and are able to express simple linear (non-branching) algorithms symbolically. They understand that computers need precise instructions and demonstrate care and precision to avoid errors. Students knows that users can develop their own programs and can demonstrate this by creating a simple program in an environment that does not rely on text e.g. programmable robots etc. Student can execute, checks and changes programs, they Students understand that programs execute by following precise instructions and that computers have no intelligence and can do nothing unless a program is executed. They Students recognise that all software executed on digital devices is programmed.

Information Technology

Students recognise that digital content can be represented in many forms. They can distinguish between some of these forms and can explain the different ways that they communicate information. They obtain content from the World Wide Web using a web browser. Students can software under the control of the teacher to create, store and edit digital content using appropriate file and folder names. Students understand that people interact with computers and can talk about their work and make changes to improve it.

Digital Literacy

Students understand the importance of communicating safely and respectfully online, and the need for keeping personal information private. They know what to do when concerned about content or being contacted. Students know the common uses of information technology beyond the classroom and can share their use of technology in school.

2

Computer Science

Students understand that algorithms are implemented on digital devices as programs. They can design simple algorithms using loops, and selection i.e. if statements. Students can use logical reasoning to predict outcomes. They detect and correct errors i.e. debugging, in algorithms. They use arithmetic operators, if statements, and loops, within programs. Students use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of programs. They can detect and corrects simple semantic errors i.e. debugging, in programs. Students recognise that a range of digital devices can be considered a computer. They recognise and can use a range of input and output devices. Students understand how programs specify the function of a general purpose computer.

Information Technology

Students recognise different types of data: text, number. They appreciate that programs can work with different types of data. Students recognise that data can be structured in tables to make it useful.  They recognise that a range of digital devices can be considered a computer. Students recognise and can use a range of input and output devices.  They navigate the web and can carry out simple web searches to collect digital content. Students use a variety of software to manipulate and present digital content: data and information. They share their experiences of technology in school and beyond the classroom. Students talk about their work and makes improvements to solutions based on feedback received.

Digital Literacy

Students demonstrate use of computers safely and responsibly, knowing a range of ways to report unacceptable content and contact when online.  They show awareness for the quality of digital content collected.

3

Computer Science

Students designs solutions (algorithms) that use repetition and two-way selection i.e. if, then and else. They can use diagrams to express solutions. Students use logical reasoning to predict outputs, showing an awareness of inputs. Students create programs that implement algorithms to achieve given goals. Students declare and assign variables. They use post-tested loop e.g. ‘until’, and a sequence of selection statements in programs, including an if, then and else statement. They know that computers collect data from various input devices, including sensors and application software. Students understand the difference between hardware and application software, and their roles within a computer system. Students understand the difference between the internet and internet service e.g. World Wide Web. 

Information Technology

Students understand the difference between data and information. They know why sorting data in a flat file can improve searching for information. They use filters or can perform single criteria searches for information. They show an awareness of and can use a range of internet services e.g. VOIP.  Students collect, organises and presents data and information in digital content. They create digital content to achieve a given goal through combining software packages and internet services to communicate with a wider audience e.g. blogging. Students can make appropriate improvements to solutions based on feedback received, and can comment on the success of the solution.

Digital Literacy

Students recognise what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour when using technologies and online services.

4

Computer Science

Students show an awareness of tasks best completed by humans or computers.  They design solutions by decomposing a problem and create a sub-solution for each of these parts (decomposition). Students recognise that different solutions exist for the same problem.  Students understand the difference between, and appropriately uses if and if, then and else statements. They use a variable and relational operator within a loop to govern termination. They can design, write and debug modular programs using procedures. They know that a procedure can be used to hide the detail with sub-solution (procedural abstraction). Students understand why and when computers are used. Students understand the main functions of the operating system. They understand how to effectively use search engines, and knows how search results are selected, including that search engines use ‘web crawler programs’

Information Technology

Students can perform more complex searches for information e.g. using Boolean and relational operators. They can analyse and evaluate data and information, and students recognise that poor quality data leads to unreliable results, and inaccurate conclusions. They know the difference between physical, wireless and mobile networks. Students recognise the audience when designing and creating digital content. They use criteria to evaluate the quality of solutions and can identify improvements making some refinements to the solution, and future solutions.

Digital Literacy

Students make judgements about digital content when evaluating and repurposing it for a given audience. They demonstrate responsible use of technologies and online services, and know a range of ways to report concerns. They can select, combines and uses internet services. Students understand the potential of information technology for collaboration when computers are networked.

5

Computer Science

Students understand that iteration is the repetition of a process such as a loop. Students recognise that different algorithms exist for the same problem.  They represent solutions using a structured notation.  Students can identify similarities and differences in situations and can use these to solve problems (pattern recognition). Students understand that programming bridges the gap between algorithmic solutions and computers.  Students have practical experience of a high-level textual language, including using standard libraries when programming. They use a range of operators and expressions e.g. Boolean, and applies them in the context of program control. Students select the appropriate data types. They define data types: real numbers and Boolean. They know that digital computers use binary to represent all data. Students understand how bit patterns represent numbers and images. Knows that computers transfer data in binary. Students understand the relationship between binary and file size (uncompressed). Students recognise and understand the function of the main internal parts of basic computer architecture. They understand the concepts behind the fetch-execute cycle. Students understand how search engines rank search results. Students understand how to construct static web pages using HTML and CSS. They understand data transmission between digital computers over networks, including the internet i.e. IP addresses and packet switching.

Information Technology

Students query data on one table using a typical query language. They know that there is a range of operating systems and application software for the same hardware. Students evaluate the appropriateness of digital devices, internet services and application software to achieve given goals. They design criteria to critically evaluate the quality of solutions, and use the criteria to identify improvements, and can make appropriate refinements to the solution.

Digital Literacy

Students recognise ethical issues surrounding the application of information technology beyond school.

6

Computer Science

Students understand a recursive solution to a problem repeatedly applies the same solution to smaller instances of the problem.  Students recognise that some problems share the same characteristics and use the same algorithm to solve both (generalisation). Students understand the notion of performance for algorithms and they appreciate that some algorithms have different performance characteristics for the same task. Uses nested selection statements. They appreciate the need for, and write, custom functions including use of parameters. They know the difference between, and use appropriately, procedures and functions. Students understand and use negation with operators. They use and manipulates one dimensional data structures. Students detect and correct syntactical errors. Students understand how numbers, images, sounds and character sets use the same bit patterns. They perform simple operations using bit patterns e.g. binary addition. Students understand the relationship between resolution and colour depth, including the effect on file size. They can distinguish between data used in a simple program (a variable) and the storage structure for that data.  Students understand the von Neumann architecture in relation to the fetch-execute cycle, including how data is stored in memory.  Students understand the basic function and operation of location addressable memory.

Information Technology

Students know the names of hardware e.g. hubs, routers, switches, and the names of protocols e.g. SMTP, iMAP, POP, FTP, TCP/IP, associated with networking computer systems. They justify the choice of and independently combine and use multiple digital devices, internet services and application software to achieve given goals. Students evaluate the trustworthiness of digital content and consider the usability of visual design features when designing and creating digital artefacts for a known audience. They can design criteria for users to evaluate the quality of solutions, uses the feedback from the users to identify improvements and can make appropriate refinements to the solution.

Digital Literacy

Students use technologies and online services securely, and know how to identify and report inappropriate conduct.  They identify and explain how the use of technology can impact on society.

7

Computer Science

Students recognise that the design of an algorithm is distinct from its expression in a programming language (which will depend on the programming constructs available). Students evaluate the effectiveness of algorithms and models for similar problems.  Students recognise where information can be filtered out in generalizing problem solutions (abstraction). They can use logical reasoning to explain how an algorithm works. They can represent algorithms using structured language. They appreciate the effect of the scope of a variable e.g. a local variable can’t be accessed from outside its function. Students understand and apply parameter passing. Students understand the difference between, and uses, both pre-tested e.g. ‘while’, and post-tested e.g. ‘until’ loops. Students apply a modular approach to error detection and correction. They know the relationship between data representation and data quality.  They understand the relationship between binary and electrical circuits, including Boolean logic. Students understand how and why values are data typed in many different languages when manipulated within programs. They know that processors have instruction sets and that these relate to low-level instructions carried out by a computer. Students understand the client-server model including how dynamic web pages use server-side scripting and that web server’s process and store data entered by users.

Information Technology

Students know the purpose of the hardware and protocols associated with networking computer systems. They undertake creative projects that collect, analyse, and evaluate data to meet the needs of a known user group. They effectively design and create digital artefacts for a wider or remote audience. They consider the properties of media when importing them into digital artefacts. Students document user feedback, the improvements identified and the refinements made to the solution.

Digital Literacy

Students recognise that persistence of data on the internet requires careful protection of online identity and privacy. They can explain and justify how the use of technology impacts on society, from the perspective of social, economical, political, legal, ethical and moral issues.

8

Computer Science

Students design a solution to a problem that depends on solutions to smaller instances of the same problem (recursion). Students understand that some problems cannot be solved computationally. They will design and write nested modular programs that enforce reusability utilising sub- routines where ever possible. Students understand the difference between ‘While’ loop and ‘For’ loop, which uses a loop counter. Students understand and use two dimensional data structures.  They perform operations using bit patterns e.g. conversion between binary and hexadecimal, binary subtraction etc. Students understand and can explain the need for data compression, and perform simple compression methods.  They have practical experience of a small (hypothetical) low level programming language. Students understand and can explain Moore’s Law. Students understand and can explain multitasking by computers.

Information Technology

Students know what a relational database is, and understand the benefits of storing data in multiple tables. Students understand the hardware associated with networking computer systems, including WANs and LANs, and understand their purpose, and how they work, including MAC addresses.

Digital Literacy

Students understand the ethical issues surrounding the application of information technology, and the existence of legal frameworks governing its use e.g. Data Protection Act, Computer Misuse Act, Copyright etc.
   

Level  

1


Pupils use mathematics as an integral part of classroom activities. They represent their work with objects or pictures and discuss it. They recognise and use a simple pattern or relationship.
 

2

Pupils select the mathematics they use in some classroom activities. They discuss their work using mathematical language and are beginning to represent it using symbols and simple diagrams. They explain why an answer is correct.

3

Pupils try different approaches and find ways of overcoming difficulties that arise when they are solving problems. They are beginning to organise their work and check results. Pupils discuss their mathematical work and are beginning to explain their thinking. They use and interpret mathematical symbols and diagrams. Pupils show that they understand a general statement by finding particular examples that match it.

4

Pupils develop their own strategies for solving problems and use these strategies both in working within mathematics and in applying mathematics to practical contexts. When solving problems, with or without ICT, they check their results are reasonable by considering the context. They look for patterns and relationships, presenting information and results in a clear and organised way, using ICT appropriately. They search for a solution by trying out ideas of their own.

5

In order to explore mathematical situations, carry out tasks or tackle problems, pupils identify the mathematical aspects and obtain necessary information. They calculate accurately, using ICT where appropriate. They check their working and results, considering whether these are sensible. They show understanding of situations by describing them mathematically using symbols, words and diagrams. They draw simple conclusions of their own and explain their reasoning.

6

Pupils carry out substantial tasks and solve quite complex problems by independently and systematically breaking them down into smaller, more manageable tasks. They interpret, discuss and synthesise information presented in a variety of mathematical forms, relating findings to the original context. Their written and spoken language explains and informs their use of diagrams. They begin to give mathematical justifications, making connections between the current situation and situations they have encountered before.

7


Starting from problems or contexts that have been presented to them, pupils explore the effects of varying values and look for invariance in models and representations, working with and without ICT. They progressively refine or extend the mathematics used, giving reasons for their choice of mathematical presentation and explaining features they have selected. They justify their generalisations, arguments or solutions, looking for equivalence
to different problems with similar structures.

They appreciate the difference between mathematical explanation and experimental evidence.
 

8


Pupils develop and follow alternative approaches. They compare and evaluate representations of a situation, introducing and using a range of mathematical techniques. They reflect on their own lines of enquiry when exploring mathematical tasks. They communicate mathematical or statistical meaning to different audiences through precise and consistent use of symbols that is sustained throughout the work. They examine generalisations or solutions reached in an activity and make further progress in the activity as a result. They comment constructively on the reasoning and logic, the process employed and the results obtained.
 

Exceptional

Performance


Pupils critically examine the strategies adopted when investigating within mathematics itself or when using mathematics to analyse tasks. They explain why different strategies were used, considering the elegance and efficiency of alternative lines of enquiry or procedures. They apply the mathematics they know in a wide range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts.

They use mathematical language and symbols effectively in presenting a convincing, reasoned argument. Their reports include mathematical justifications, distinguishing between evidence and proof and explaining their solutions to problems involving a number of features or variables.
 
 
 

Level Listening & responding, Speaking, Reading & responding, & Writing

1

Pupils show that they understand a few familiar spoken words and phrases. They understand speech spoken clearly, face to face or from a good-quality recording. They may need a lot of help, such as repetition or gesture.
Pupils say single words and short, simple phrases in response to what they see and hear. They may need considerable support from a spoken model and from visual clues. They imitate correct pronunciation with some success.
Pupils recognise and read out a few familiar words and phrases presented in clear script in a familiar context. They may need visual clues.
Pupils write or copy simple words or symbols correctly. They label items and select appropriate words to complete short phrases or sentences.

2

Pupils show that they understand a range of familiar spoken phrases. They respond to a clear model of standard language, but may need items to be repeated.
Pupils answer simple questions and give basic information. They give short, simple responses to what they see and hear, and use set phrases. Their pronunciation shows an awareness of sound patterns and their meaning is clear.
Pupils show that they understand familiar written phrases. They match sound to print by reading aloud familiar words and phrases. They use books or glossaries to find out the meanings of new  words.
Pupils write one or two short sentences, following a model, and fill in the words on a simple form. They label items and write familiar short phrases correctly. When they write familiar words from memory, their spelling may be approximate.

3

Pupils show that they understand the main points from short spoken passages made up of familiar language. They identify and note personal responses. They may need short sections to be repeated.

Pupils ask and answer simple questions and talk about their interests. They take part in brief prepared tasks, using visual or other clues to help them initiate and respond. They use short phrases to express personal responses. Although they use mainly memorised language, they occasionally substitute items of vocabulary to vary questions or statements.

Pupils show that they understand the main points and personal responses in short written texts in clear printed script made up of familiar language in simple sentences. They are beginning to read independently, selecting simple texts and using a bilingual dictionary or glossary to look up new words.

Pupils write a few short sentences, with support, using expressions that they have already learnt. They express personal responses. They write short phrases from memory and their spelling is readily understandable.

4

Pupils show that they understand the main points and some of the detail from spoken passages made up of familiar language in simple sentences. They may need some items to be repeated.

Pupils take part in simple conversations, supported by visual or other cues, and express their opinions. They begin to use their knowledge of grammar to adapt and substitute single words and phrases. Their pronunciation is generally accurate and they show some consistency in their intonation.

Pupils show that they understand the main points and some of the detail in short written texts from familiar contexts. When reading on their own, as well as using a bilingual dictionary or glossary, they begin to use context to work out the meaning of unfamiliar words. Pupils write short texts on familiar topics, adapting language that they have already learnt. They draw largely on memorised language. They begin to use their knowledge of grammar to adapt and substitute individual words and set phrases. They begin to use dictionaries or glossaries to check words they have learnt.

5

Pupils show that they understand the main points and opinions in spoken passages made up of familiar material from various contexts, including present and past or future events. They may need some repetition.

Pupils give a short prepared talk that includes expressing their opinions. They take part in short conversations, seeking and conveying information, opinions and reasons in simple terms. They refer to recent experiences or future plans, as well as everyday activities and interests. They vary their language and sometimes produce more extended responses. Although there may be some mistakes, pupils make themselves understood with little or no difficulty
Pupils show that they understand the main points and opinions in written texts from various contexts, including present, past or future events. Their independent reading includes authentic materials. They are generally confident in reading aloud, and in using reference materials.

Pupils write short texts on a range of familiar topics, using simple sentences. They refer to recent experiences or future plans, as well as to everyday activities. Although there may be some mistakes, the meaning can be understood with little or no difficulty. They use dictionaries or glossaries to check words they have learnt and to look up unknown words.

6

Pupils show that they understand the difference between present, past and future events in a range of spoken material that includes familiar language in less familiar contexts. They identify and note the main points and specific details. They need little repetition.

Pupils give a short prepared talk, expressing opinions and answering simple questions about it. They take part in conversations, using a variety of structures and producing more detailed or extended responses. They apply their knowledge of grammar in new contexts. Although they may be hesitant at times, pupils make themselves understood with little or no difficulty and with increasing confidence.
Pupils show that they understand the difference between present, past and future events in a range of texts that include familiar language in less familiar contexts. They identify and note the main points and specific details. They scan written material for stories or articles of interest and choose books or texts to read independently, at their own level. They are more confident in using context and their knowledge of grammar to work out the meaning of unfamiliar language. Pupils write texts giving and seeking information and opinions. They use descriptive language and a variety of structures. They apply grammar in new contexts. Although there may be a few mistakes, the meaning is usually clear.

7

Pupils show that they understand longer passages and recognise people’s points of view. The passages cover a range of material that contains some complex sentences and unfamiliar language. They understand language spoken at near normal speed, and need little repetition.

Pupils answer unprepared questions. They initiate and develop conversations and discuss matters of personal or topical interest. They improvise and paraphrase. Their pronunciation and intonation are good, and their language is usually accurate.

Pupils show that they understand longer texts and recognise people’s points of view. These texts cover a range of imaginative and factual material that contains some complex sentences and unfamiliar language. Pupils use new vocabulary and structures found in their reading to respond in speech or writing. They use reference materials when these are helpful.

Pupils write articles or stories of varying lengths, conveying opinions and points of view. They write about real and imaginary subjects and use an appropriate register. They link sentences and paragraphs, structure ideas and adapt previously learnt language for their own purposes. They edit and redraft their work, using reference sources to improve their accuracy, precision and variety of expression.

8


Pupils show that they understand passages including some unfamiliar material and recognise attitudes and emotions. These passages include different types of spoken material from a range of sources. When listening to familiar and less familiar material, they draw inferences, and need little repetition.

Pupils narrate events, tell a story or relate the plot of a book or film and give their opinions. They justify their opinions and discuss facts, ideas and experiences. They use a range of vocabulary, structures and time references. They adapt language to deal with unprepared situations. They speak confidently, with good pronunciation and intonation. Their language is largely accurate, with few mistakes of any significance. 

Pupils show that they understand texts including some unfamiliar material and recognise attitudes and emotions. These texts cover a wide variety of types of written material, including unfamiliar topics and more complex language. When reading for personal interest and for information, pupils consult a range of reference sources where appropriate.

Pupils produce formal and informal texts in an appropriate style on familiar topics. They express and justify ideas, opinions or personal points of view and seek the views of others. They develop the content of what they have read, seen or heard. Their spelling and grammar are generally accurate. They use reference materials to extend their range of language and improve their accuracy.

 

Exceptional

Performance

Pupils show that they understand the gist of a range of authentic passages in familiar contexts. These passages cover a range of factual and imaginative speech, some of which expresses different points of view, issues and concerns. They summarise, report, and explain extracts, orally or in writing.

Pupils take part in discussions covering a range of factual and imaginative topics. They give, justify and seek personal opinions and ideas in informal and formal situations. They deal confidently with unpredictable elements in conversations, or with people who are unfamiliar. They speak fluently, with consistently accurate pronunciation, and can vary intonation. They give clear messages and make few errors.

Pupils show that they understand a wide range of authentic texts in familiar contexts. These texts include factual and imaginative material, some of which express different points of view, issues and concerns, and which include official and formal texts. Pupils summarise, report, and explain extracts, orally or in writing. They develop their independent reading by choosing and responding to stories, articles, books and plays, according to their interests.

Pupils communicate ideas accurately and in an appropriate style over a range of familiar topics, both factual and imaginative. They write coherently and accurately

 
 

Level  

1


Pupils recognise and explore how sounds can be made and changed. They use their voices in different ways such as speaking, singing and chanting, and perform with awareness of others. They repeat short rhythmic and melodic patterns and create and choose sounds in response to given starting points. They respond to different moods in music and recognise well-defined changes in sounds, identify simple repeated patterns and take account of musical instructions.

2

Pupils recognise and explore how sounds can be organised. They sing with a sense of the shape of the melody, and perform simple patterns and accompaniments keeping to a steady pulse. They choose carefully and order sounds within simple structures such as beginning, middle, end, and in response to given starting points. They represent sounds with symbols and recognise how the musical elements can be used to create different moods and effects. They improve their own work.

3

Pupils recognise and explore the ways sounds can be combined and used expressively. They sing in tune with expression and perform rhythmically simple parts that use a limited range of notes. They improvise repeated patterns and combine several layers of sound with awareness of the combined effect. They recognise how the different musical elements are combined and used expressively and make improvements to their own work, commenting on the intended effect.

4

Pupils identify and explore the relationship between sounds and how music reflects different intentions. While performing by ear and from simple notations, they maintain their own part with awareness of how the different parts fit together and the need to achieve an overall effect. They improvise melodic and rhythmic phrases as part of a group performance and compose by developing ideas within musical structures. They describe, compare and evaluate different kinds of music using an appropriate musical vocabulary. They suggest improvements to their own and others’ work, commenting on how intentions have been achieved.

5

Pupils identify and explore musical devices and how music reflects time, place and culture. They perform significant parts from memory and from notations, with awareness of their own contribution such as leading others, taking a solo part or providing rhythmic support. They improvise melodic and rhythmic material within given structures, use a variety of notations, and compose music for different occasions using appropriate musical devices. They analyse and compare musical features. They evaluate how venue, occasion and purpose affect the way music is created, performed and heard. They refine and improve their work.

6

Pupils identify and explore the different processes and contexts of selected musical styles, genres and traditions. They select and make expressive use of tempo, dynamics, phrasing and timbre. They make subtle adjustments to fit their own part within a group performance. They improvise and compose in different styles and genres, using harmonic and non-harmonic devices where relevant, sustaining and developing musical ideas, and achieving different intended effects. They use relevant notations to plan, revise and refine material. They analyse, compare and evaluate how music reflects the contexts in which it is created, performed and heard. They make improvements to their own and others’ work in the light of the chosen style.

7


Pupils discriminate between and explore musical conventions in, and influences on, selected styles, genres and traditions. They perform in different styles, making significant contributions to the ensemble and using relevant notations. They create coherent compositions drawing on internalised sounds. They adapt, improvise, develop, extend and discard musical ideas within given and chosen musical structures, styles, genres and traditions. They evaluate, and make critical judgements about, the use of musical conventions and other characteristics and how different contexts are reflected in their own and others’ work.
 
 

8


Pupils discriminate between and exploit the characteristics and expressive potential of selected musical resources, styles, genres and traditions. They perform, improvise and compose extended compositions with a sense of direction and shape, both within melodic and rhythmic phrases and overall form. They explore different styles, genres and traditions, working by ear and by making accurate use of appropriate notations. They both follow and challenge conventions. They discriminate between musical styles, genres and traditions, commenting on the relationship between the music and its cultural context, and making and justifying their own judgements.
 
 

Exceptional

Performance


Pupils discriminate between and develop different interpretations. They express their own ideas and feelings in a developing personal style, exploiting instrumental and/or vocal possibilities. They give convincing performances and demonstrate empathy with other performers. They produce compositions that demonstrate a coherent development of musical ideas, consistency of style and a degree of individuality. They discriminate and comment on how and why changes occur within selected traditions, including the particular contribution of significant performers and composers.
 
   

 

 

Key Stage 3

 

Economic Well-Being And Financial Capability

1

Career

Learners are able to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of ‘career’ in relation to examples of people that they know and recognise their strengths, achievements and weaknesses and evaluate how these might inform future choices in learning and work.  They will be able to describe some of the qualities, attitudes and skills needed for employability. 

 

2

Capability

Learners are able to demonstrate a range of enterprise skills, attitudes and qualities and assess their needs, interests, skills, attitudes and aspirations in relation to options for learning and work and make creative and realistic plans for transition into Key Stage 4. They will be able to use information sources to explore options and choices for learning and work.
 

3

Risk

Learners are able to explain the positive and negative aspects of risk-taking in relation to economic issues and financial and career choices.  They can assess and manage risks relating to financial, enterprise and career choices, and learn from mistakes.

4

 

Economic understanding

Learners are able to demonstrate an understanding of the economic and business environment, including how and why different businesses operate, and of different types of work, including employment, self-employment and voluntary work. They will demonstrate and apply understanding of economic ideas and explain a range of basic economic and business terms. 

Key Stage 3

Personal Well-Being

1

Personal identities

Learners are able to reflect on and evaluate their achievements and strengths in different areas of their lives and can recognise strong emotions and identify ways of managing these positively. They will recognise that external factors, such as relationships, achievements and setbacks, can affect emotional well-being, and identify how they can take this into account.

2

Healthy lifestyles

Learners are able to identify characteristics of good health and how to stay physically, emotionally and mentally healthy and make informed choices about their health and well-being and explain reasons for their choices.  They will be able to demonstrate effective ways of resisting negative pressure, including peer pressure and describe the main effects of, and laws relating to, alcohol, tobacco and other legal and illegal drugs.

3

 

Risk

Learners are able to describe the positive and negative impacts of risk-taking on their health and well-being and assess and manage risks associated with personal lifestyle choices and situation, try new ideas and face challenges safely.

 

4

Relationships

Learners are able to identify the importance of having a variety of social and personal relationships and how these can impact on their lives and well-being.  They will understand the nature and importance of marriage and stable relationships to parenthood and family life and discuss ways that relationships might change over time and demonstrate how to negotiate within relationships.

5

Diversity

Learners are able to describe differences and diversity and demonstrate respect and empathy towards others who live their lives differently from them.  They will be able to challenge prejudice and discrimination in an appropriate manner and demonstrate recognition of the achievements, strengths and worth of others. 

Key Stage 4

Economic well-being and financial capability

1

Career

Learners are able to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of ‘career’ in relation to examples of people that they know and recognise their strengths, achievements and weaknesses and evaluate how these might inform future choices in learning and work.  They will be able to describe some of the qualities, attitudes and skills needed for employability.
 

2


Capability

Learners are able to demonstrate a range of enterprise skills, attitudes and qualities and assess their needs, interests, skills, attitudes and aspirations in relation to options for learning and work and make creative and realistic plans for transition into Key Stage 4. They will be able to use information sources to explore options and choices for learning and work
 

3

Risk

Learners are able to explain the positive and negative aspects of risk-taking in relation to economic issues and financial and career choices. They can assess and manage risks relating to financial, enterprise and career choices, and learn from mistakes.
 

4

Economic understanding

Learners are able to demonstrate an understanding of the economic and business environment, including how and why different businesses operate, and of different types of work, including employment, self-employment and voluntary work. They will demonstrate and apply understanding of economic ideas and explain a range of basic economic and business terms.

Key Stage 4

Personal well-being

1

Personal identities

Learners are able to reflect on and evaluate their achievements and strengths in different areas of their lives and can recognise strong emotions and identify ways of managing these positively. They will recognise that external factors, such as relationships, achievements and setbacks, can affect emotional well-being, and identify how they can take this into account.
 

2

Healthy lifestyles

Learners are able to identify characteristics of good health and how to stay physically, emotionally and mentally healthy and make informed choices about their health and well-being and explain reasons for their choices.  They will be able to demonstrate effective ways of resisting negative pressure, including peer pressure and describe the main effects of, and laws relating to, alcohol, tobacco and other legal and illegal drugs.
 

3

Risk

Learners are able to describe the positive and negative impacts of risk-taking on their health and well-being and assess and manage risks associated with personal lifestyle choices and situation, try new ideas and face challenges safely.
 

4

Relationships

Learners are able to identify the importance of having a variety of social and personal relationships and how these can impact on their lives and well-being.  They will understand the nature and importance of marriage and stable relationships to parenthood and family life and discuss ways that relationships might change over time and demonstrate how to negotiate within relationships.
 

5

Diversity

Learners are able to describe differences and diversity and demonstrate respect and empathy towards others who live their lives differently from them.  They will be able to challenge prejudice and discrimination in an appropriate manner and demonstrate recognition of the achievements, strengths and worth of others.

End of Key Stage

Statements

Economic well-being and financial capability

Career Learners are able to:

identify a range of post-16 options and careers advice and support networks that they can use to plan and negotiate their career pathways
relate their abilities, attributes and achievements to career plans, setting personal targets and evaluating choices
complete application procedures, including CVs and personal statements, and prepare for interviews.
 
Capability Learners are able to:

demonstrate a range of enterprise skills when working independently and with others
explain some of the financial products and services that will help them manage their current and future personal finances
demonstrate how to seek out and secure opportunities for learning and work and develop, review and adapt plans for transition from Key Stage 4
critically evaluate a wide range of goods and services from the consumer's point of view.
 
Risk Learners are able to:

calculate and balance the element of positive and negative risk when making decisions related to economic issues and financial and career choices
recognise that risk assessment and risk management are part of life and give examples of ways to manage and reduce risk in different circumstances.
 
Economic understanding Learners are able to:

explain the structure and function of different businesses across the public, private and voluntary sectors and show how some of these could be relevant to their future lives and careers
explain how employment trends and opportunities are influenced by economic forces and relate these to their own career plans
explain how finance will pay an important part in their lives and in achieving aspirations, and how changes in the economic environment may impact upon these
 

End of Key Stage

Statements

Personal well-being 

Personal identities     Learners are able to:

make judgments about their personal qualities, skills and achievements and use these to set future goals.
present themselves confidently and respond positively to praise and criticism.
explain how changes in personal circumstances may affect their feelings and behaviour, and how they can manage such situations effectively.
 
Healthy lifestyles    Learners are able to:

describe the short and long-term consequences of personal health choices, including choices relating to sexual activity and substance use and misuse and make decisions based on this knowledge.
identify some of the causes and symptoms of mental and emotional ill health, and identify strategies for recognising, preventing and addressing these in themselves and others.
demonstrate confidence in finding professional health advice and help others to do so.
identify reasons why people might use illegal drugs and explain how drug use can impact on physical, mental and economic aspects of people’s lives, relationships and the wider community.
 
Risk Learners are able to:

evaluate the potential risks and benefits of personal lifestyle choices including their impact on relationships.
recognise that risk assessment and management are part of life and give examples of how to manage and reduce risk in different circumstances.
 
Relationships Learners are able to:

develop appropriate relationships with a widening range of adults in a variety of contexts.
explain the importance of different relationships and associated responsibilities, including the significance of marriage, stable relationships, civil partnerships, and long term commitments.
describe some of the possible effects of family and other significant events on feelings, emotions and personal wellbeing, and the impact these may have on relationships.
 
Diversity Learners are able to:

explain how differing cultures, faiths and beliefs may influence lifestyle choices, and demonstrate respect for these differences.
take the initiative in challenging or giving support in connection with offensive or abusive behaviour.
 
   

Level

 

1

Pupils copy, repeat and explore simple skills and actions with basic control and coordination. They start to link these skills and actions in ways that suit the activities. They describe and comment on their own and others' actions. They talk about how to exercise safely, and how their bodies feel during an activity.

2

Pupils explore simple skills. They copy, remember, repeat and explore simple actions with control and coordination. They vary skills, actions and ideas and link these in ways that suit the activities. They begin to show some understanding of simple tactics and basic compositional ideas. They talk about differences between their own and others' performance and suggest improvements. They understand how to exercise safely, and describe how their bodies feel during different activities

3

Pupils select and use skills, actions and ideas appropriately, applying them with coordination and control. They show that they understand tactics and composition by starting to vary how they respond. They can see how their work is similar to and different from others' work, and use this understanding to improve their own performance. They give reasons why warming up before an activity is important, and why physical activity is good for their health.

4

Pupils link skills, techniques and ideas and apply them accurately and appropriately. Their performance shows precision, control and fluency. They understand tactics and composition. They compare and comment on skills, techniques and ideas used in their own and others' work, and use this understanding to improve their performance. They explain and apply basic safety principles in preparing for exercise. They describe what effects exercise has on their bodies, and how it is valuable to their fitness and health.

5


Pupils select and combine their skills, techniques and ideas and apply them accurately and appropriately, consistently showing precision, control and fluency. When performing, they draw on what they know about strategy, tactics and composition. They analyse and comment on skills and techniques and how these are applied in their own and others' work. They modify and refine skills and techniques to improve their performance. They explain how the body reacts during different types of exercise, and warm up and cool down in ways that suit the activity. They explain why regular, safe exercise is good for their fitness and health.
 
 

6


Pupils select and combine skills, techniques and ideas. They apply them in ways that suit the activity, with consistent precision, control and fluency. When planning their own and others' work, and carrying out their own work, they draw on what they know about strategy, tactics and composition in response to changing circumstances, and what they know about their own and others' strengths and weaknesses. They analyse and comment on how skills, techniques and ideas have been used in their own and others' work, and on compositional and other aspects of performance, and suggest ways to improve. They explain how to prepare for, and recover from, the activities. They explain how different types of exercise contribute to their fitness and health and describe how they might get involved in other types of activities and exercise.
 
 

7


Pupils select and combine advanced skills, techniques and ideas, adapting them accurately and appropriately to the demands of the activities. They consistently show precision, control, fluency and originality. Drawing on what they know of the principles of advanced tactics and compositional ideas, they apply these in their own and others' work. They modify them in response to changing circumstances and other performers. They analyse and comment on their own and others' work as individuals and team members, showing that they understand how skills, tactics or composition and fitness relate to the quality of the performance. They plan ways to improve their own and others' performance. They explain the principles of practice and training, and apply them effectively. They explain the benefits of regular, planned activity on health and fitness and plan their own appropriate exercise and activity programme.
 
 

8


Pupils consistently distinguish and apply advanced skills, techniques and ideas, consistently showing high standards of precision, control, fluency and originality. Drawing on what they know of the principles of advanced tactics or composition, they apply these principles with proficiency and flair in their own and others' work. They adapt it appropriately in response to changing circumstances and other performers. 

They evaluate their own and others' work, showing that they understand the impact of skills, strategy and tactics or composition, and fitness on the quality and effectiveness of performance. They plan ways in which their own and others' performance could be improved. They create action plans and ways of monitoring improvement. They use their knowledge of health and fitness to plan and evaluate their own and others' exercise and activity programme.
 

Exceptional Performance


Pupils consistently use advanced skills, techniques and ideas with precision and fluency. Drawing on what they know of the principles of advanced strategies and tactics or composition, they consistently apply these principles with originality, proficiency and flair in their own and others' work. They evaluate their own and others' work, showing that they understand how skills, strategy and tactics or composition, and fitness relate to and affect the quality and originality of performance. They reach judgments independently about how their own and others' performance could be improved, prioritising aspects for further development. They consistently apply appropriate knowledge and understanding of health and fitness in all aspects of their work.
 
 
 

Level

 

1

Pupils use some religious words and phrases to recognise and name features of religious life and practice. They recall religious stories and recognise symbols, and other verbal and visual forms of religious expression. They talk about their own experiences and feelings, what they find interesting or puzzling and what is of value and concern to themselves and to others.

2

Pupils use religious words and phrases to identify some features of religion and its importance for some people. They begin to show awareness of similarities in religions. Pupils retell religious stories and suggest meanings for religious actions and symbols. They identify how religion is expressed in different ways. Pupils ask, and respond sensitively to, questions about their own and others’ experiences and feelings. They recognise that some questions cause people to wonder and are difficult to answer. In relation to matters of right and wrong, they recognise their own values and those of others.

3

Pupils use a developing religious vocabulary to describe some key features of religions, recognising similarities and differences. They make links between beliefs and sources, including religious stories and sacred texts. They begin to identify the impact religion has on believers’ lives. They describe some forms of religious expression. They identify what influences them, making links between aspects of their own and others’ experiences. They ask important questions about religion and beliefs, making links between their own and others’ responses. They make links between values and commitments, and their own attitudes and behaviour.

4

Pupils use a developing religious vocabulary to describe and show understanding of sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences. They make links between them, and describe some similarities and differences both within and between religions. They describe the impact of religion on people’s lives. They suggest meanings for a range of forms of religious expression. Pupils raise, and suggest answers to, questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. They apply their ideas to their own and other people’s lives. They describe what inspires and influences themselves and others.

5


Pupils use an increasingly wide religious vocabulary to explain the impact of beliefs on individuals and communities. They describe why people belong to religions. They understand that similarities and differences illustrate distinctive beliefs within and between religions and suggest possible reasons for this. They explain how religious sources are used to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues, recognising diversity in forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression, within and between religions. Pupils ask, and suggest answers to, questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, values and commitments, relating them to their own and others’ lives. They explain what inspires and influences them, expressing their own and others’ views on the challenges of belonging to a religion.
 

6


Pupils use religious and philosophical vocabulary to give informed accounts of religions and beliefs, explaining the reasons for diversity within and between them. They explain why the impact of religions and beliefs on individuals, communities and societies varies. They interpret sources and arguments, explaining the reasons that are used in different ways by different traditions to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues. They interpret the significance of different forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression. Pupils use reasoning and examples to express insights into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and world issues. They express insights into their own and others’ views on questions of identity and belonging, meaning, purpose and truth. They consider the challenges of belonging to a religion in the contemporary world, focusing on values and commitments.
 

7


Pupils use a wide religious and philosophical vocabulary to show a coherent understanding of a range of religions and beliefs. They analyse issues, values and questions of meaning and truth. They account for the influence of history and culture on aspects of religious life and practice. They explain why the consequences of belonging to a faith are not the same for all people within the same religion or tradition. They use some of the principal methods by which religion, spirituality and ethics are studied, including the use of a variety of sources, evidence and forms of expression. Pupils articulate personal and critical responses to questions of meaning, purpose and truth and ethical issues. They evaluate the significance of religious and other views for understanding questions of human relationships, belonging, identity, society, values and commitments, using appropriate evidence and examples.
 

8


Pupils use a comprehensive religious and philosophical vocabulary to analyse a range of religions and beliefs. They contextualise interpretations of religion with reference to historical, cultural, social and philosophical ideas. They critically evaluate the impact of religions and beliefs on differing communities and societies. They analyse differing interpretations of religious, spiritual and moral sources, using some of the principal methods by which religion, spirituality and ethics are studied. They interpret and evaluate varied forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression. Pupils coherently analyse a wide range of viewpoints on questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments. They synthesise a range of evidence, arguments, reflections and examples, fully justifying their own views and ideas and providing a detailed evaluation of the perspectives of others.
 
 

Exceptional Performance


Pupils use a complex religious, moral and philosophical vocabulary to provide a consistent and detailed analysis of religions and beliefs. They evaluate in depth the importance of religious diversity in a pluralistic society. They clearly recognise the extent to which the impact of religion and beliefs on different communities and societies has changed over time. They provide a detailed analysis of how religious, spiritual and moral sources are interpreted in different ways, evaluating the principal methods by which religion and spirituality are studied. They synthesise effectively their accounts of the varied forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression. Pupils analyse in depth a wide range of perspectives on questions of identity and belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, and values and commitments. They give independent, well-informed and highly reasoned insights into their own and others’ perspectives on religious and spiritual issues, providing well-substantiated and balanced conclusions.
 
   

Level

 

SC1 - Scientific Enquiry

 

3


Pupils respond to suggestions and put forward their own ideas about how to find the answer to a question. They recognise why it is important to collect data to answer questions. They use simple texts to find information. They make relevant observations and measure quantities, such as length or mass, using a range of simple equipment. Where appropriate, they carry out a fair test with some help, recognising and explaining why it is fair. They record their observations in a variety of ways. They provide explanations for observations and for simple patterns in recorded measurements. They communicate in a scientific way what they have found out and suggest improvements in their work. 
 

4

Pupils recognise that scientific ideas are based on evidence. In their own investigative work, they decide on an appropriate approach [for example, using a fair test] to answer a question. Where appropriate, they describe, or show in the way they perform their task, how to vary one factor while keeping others the same. Where appropriate, they make predictions. They select information from sources provided for them. They select suitable equipment and make a series of observations and measurements that are adequate for the task. They record their observations, comparisons and measurements using tables and bar charts. They begin to plot points to form simple graphs, and use these graphs to point out and interpret patterns in their data. They begin to relate their conclusions to these patterns and to scientific knowledge and understanding, and to communicate them with appropriate scientific language. They suggest improvements in their work, giving reasons. 

5

Pupils describe how experimental evidence and creative thinking have been combined to provide a scientific explanation [for example, Jenner's work on vaccination at key stage 2, Lavoisier's work on burning at key stage 3]. When they try to answer a scientific question, they identify an appropriate approach. They select from a range of sources of information. When the investigation involves a fair test, they identify key factors to be considered. Where appropriate, they make predictions based on their scientific knowledge and understanding. They select apparatus for a range of tasks and plan to use it effectively. They make a series of observations, comparisons or measurements with precision appropriate to the task. They begin to repeat observations and measurements and to offer simple explanations for any differences they encounter. They record observations and measurements systematically and, where appropriate, present data as line graphs. They draw conclusions that are consistent with the evidence and begin to relate these to scientific knowledge and understanding. They make practical suggestions about how their working methods could be improved. They use appropriate scientific language and conventions to communicate quantitative and qualitative data. 

6

Pupils describe evidence for some accepted scientific ideas and explain how the interpretation of evidence by scientists leads to the development and acceptance of new ideas. In their own investigative work, they use scientific knowledge and understanding to identify an appropriate approach. They select and use sources of information effectively. They make enough measurements, comparisons and observations for the task. They measure a variety of quantities with precision, using instruments with fine-scale divisions. They choose scales for graphs and diagrams that enable them to show data and features effectively. They identify measurements and observations that do not fit the main pattern shown. They draw conclusions that are consistent with the evidence and use scientific knowledge and understanding to explain them. They make reasoned suggestions about how their working methods could be improved. They select and use appropriate methods for communicating qualitative and quantitative data using scientific language and conventions. 

7

Pupils describe some predictions based on scientific theories and give examples of the evidence collected to test these predictions. In their own work, they use scientific knowledge and understanding to decide on appropriate approaches to questions. They identify the key factors in complex contexts and in contexts in which variables cannot readily be controlled, and plan appropriate procedures. They synthesise information from a range of sources, and identify possible limitations in secondary data. They make systematic observations and measurements with precision, using a wide range of apparatus. They identify when they need to repeat measurements, comparisons and observations in order to obtain reliable data. Where appropriate, they represent data in graphs, using lines of best fit. They draw conclusions that are consistent with the evidence and explain these using scientific knowledge and understanding. They begin to consider whether the data they have collected are sufficient for the conclusions they have drawn. They communicate what they have done using a wide range of scientific and technical language and conventions, including symbols and flow diagrams. 
 

8

Pupils give examples of scientific explanations or models that have had to be changed in the light of additional scientific evidence. They evaluate and synthesise data from a range of sources. They recognise that investigating different kinds of scientific questions requires different strategies, and use scientific knowledge and understanding to select an appropriate strategy in their own work. They decide which observations are relevant in qualitative work and include suitable detail in their records. They decide the level of precision needed in comparisons or measurements, and collect data enabling them to test relationships between variables. They identify and begin to explain anomalous observations and measurements and allow for these when they draw graphs. They use scientific knowledge and understanding to draw conclusions from their evidence. They consider graphs and tables of results critically. They communicate findings and arguments using appropriate scientific language and conventions, showing awareness of a range of views. 

Exceptional Performance

Pupils give examples of scientific explanations and models that have been challenged by subsequent experiments and explain the significance of the evidence in modifying scientific theories. They evaluate and synthesise data from a range of sources. They recognise that investigating different kinds of scientific questions requires different strategies, and use scientific knowledge and understanding to select an appropriate strategy in their own work. They make records of relevant observations and comparisons, clearly identifying points of particular significance. They decide the level of precision needed in measurements and collect data that satisfy these requirements. They use their data to test relationships between variables. They identify and explain anomalous observations and measurements, allowing for these when they draw graphs. They use scientific knowledge and understanding to interpret trends and patterns and to draw conclusions from their evidence. They consider graphs and tables of results critically and give reasoned accounts of how they could collect additional evidence. They communicate findings and arguments using appropriate scientific language and conventions, showing their awareness of the degree of uncertainty and a range of alternative views. 

   

 


Level
 
 
SC2 - Life Processes & Living Things

3


Pupils use their knowledge and understanding of basic life processes [for example, growth, reproduction] when they describe differences between living and non-living things. They provide simple explanations for changes in living things [for example, diet affecting the health of humans or other animals, lack of light or water altering plant growth]. They identify ways in which an animal is suited to its environment [for example, a fish having fins to help it swim]. 
 

4

Pupils demonstrate knowledge and understanding of life processes and living things drawn from the key stage 2 or key stage 3 programme of study. They use scientific names for some major organs of body systems [for example, the heart at key stage 2, the stomach at key stage 3] and identify the position of these organs in the human body. They identify organs [for example, stamen at key stage 2, stigma, root hairs at key stage 3] of different plants they observe. They use keys based on observable external features to help them to identify and group living things systematically. They recognise that feeding relationships exist between plants and animals in a habitat, and describe these relationships using food chains and terms [for example, predator and prey]. 

5

Pupils demonstrate an increasing knowledge and understanding of life processes and living things drawn from the key stage 2 or key stage 3 programme of study. They describe the main functions of organs of the human body [for example, the heart at key stage 2, stomach at key stage 3], and of the plant [for example, the stamen at key stage 2, root hairs at key stage 3]. They explain how these functions are essential to the organism. They describe the main stages of the life cycles of humans and flowering plants and point out similarities. They recognise that there is a great variety of living things and understand the importance of classification. They explain that different organisms are found in different habitats because of differences in environmental factors [for example, the availability of light or water]. 

6

Pupils use knowledge and understanding drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study to describe and explain life processes and features of living things. They use appropriate scientific terminology when they describe life processes [for example, respiration, photosynthesis] in animals and plants. They distinguish between related processes [for example, pollination, fertilisation]. They describe simple cell structure and identify differences between simple animal and plant cells. They describe some of the causes of variation between living things. They explain that the distribution and abundance of organisms in habitats are affected by environmental factors [for example, the availability of light or water]. 

7

Pupils use knowledge and understanding of life processes and living things drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study to make links between life processes in animals and plants and the organ systems involved. They explain the processes of respiration and photosynthesis in terms of the main underlying chemical change. They use their knowledge of cell structure to explain how cells [for example, ovum, sperm, root hair] are adapted to their functions. They identify common variations between individuals, including some features [for example, eye colour] that are inherited and others [for example, height] that can also be affected by environmental factors. They construct models [for example, food webs, pyramids of numbers] to show feeding relationships, and explain how these relationships affect population size. 
 

8

Pupils demonstrate an extensive knowledge and understanding of life processes and living things drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study by describing and explaining how biological systems function. They relate the cellular structure of organs to the associated life processes [for example, the absorption of food in the digestive system, gas exchange in the lungs]. They recognise, predict and explain changes in biological systems [for example, the effect of increased carbon dioxide concentration on the growth of greenhouse crops, the consequences of smoking for organ systems]. They explain how characteristics can be inherited by individuals and apply their knowledge [for example, in relation to selective breeding]. They predict the short-term and long-term effects of environmental change on ecosystems and use their understanding of such systems to justify their predictions. 

Exceptional Performance

Pupils demonstrate both breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study when they describe and explain how biological systems function. They recognise that organisms respond to change, and describe ways in which this is achieved. They relate their understanding of internal and external cellular structures to life processes [for example, the increased surface areas of cells in the digestive system]. They relate their understanding of cellular structure to inheritance and variation and explain how this leads to new varieties [for example, how genetic engineering is a modern form of selective breeding]. They recognise the importance of quantitative data [for example, related to populations in an environment] when they describe and explain patterns of change within an ecosystem 

   

 


Level

SC3 - Materials & their Properties
 

3


Pupils use their knowledge and understanding of materials when they describe a variety of ways of sorting them into groups according to their properties. They explain simply why some materials are particularly suitable for specific purposes [for example, glass for windows, copper for electrical cables]. They recognise that some changes [for example, the freezing of water] can be reversed and some [for example, the baking of clay] cannot, and they classify changes in this way. 
 

4

Pupils demonstrate knowledge and understanding of materials and their properties drawn from the key stage 2 or key stage 3 programme of study. They describe differences between the properties of different materials and explain how these differences are used to classify substances [for example, as solids, liquids, gases at key stage 2, as acids, alkalis at key stage 3]. They describe some methods [for example, filtration, distillation] that are used to separate simple mixtures. They use scientific terms [for example, evaporation, condensation] to describe changes. They use knowledge about some reversible and irreversible changes to make simple predictions about whether other changes are reversible or not. 

5

Pupils demonstrate an increasing knowledge and understanding of materials and their properties drawn from the key stage 2 or key stage 3 programme of study. They describe some metallic properties [for example, good electrical conductivity] and use these properties to distinguish metals from other solids. They identify a range of contexts in which changes [for example, evaporation, condensation] take place. They use knowledge about how a specific mixture [for example, salt and water, sand and water] can be separated to suggest ways in which other similar mixtures might be separated. 

6

Pupils use knowledge and understanding of the nature and behaviour of materials drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study to describe chemical and physical changes, and how new materials can be made. They recognise that matter is made up of particles, and describe differences between the arrangement and movement of particles in solids, liquids and gases. They identify and describe similarities between some chemical reactions [for example, the reactions of acids with metals, the reactions of a variety of substances with oxygen]. They use word equations to summarise simple reactions. They relate changes of state to energy transfers in a range of contexts [for example, the formation of igneous rocks]. 

7

Pupils use knowledge and understanding drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study to make links between the nature and behaviour of materials and the particles of which they are composed. They use the particle model of matter in explanations of phenomena [for example, changes of state]. They explain differences between elements, compounds and mixtures in terms of their constituent particles. They recognise that elements and compounds can be represented by symbols and formulae. They apply their knowledge of physical and chemical processes to explain the behaviour of materials in a variety of contexts [for example, the way in which natural limestone is changed through the action of rainwater, ways in which rocks are weathered]. They use patterns of reactivity [for example, those associated with a reactivity series of metals] to make predictions about other chemical reactions. 
 

8

Pupils demonstrate an extensive knowledge and understanding drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study, which they use to describe and explain the behaviour of, and changes to, materials. They use the particle model in a wide range of contexts. They describe what happens in a range of chemical reactions and classify some [for example, oxidation, neutralisation]. They represent common compounds by chemical formulae and use these formulae to form balanced symbol equations for reactions [for example, those of acids with metals, carbonates or oxides]. They apply their knowledge of patterns in chemical reactions to suggest how substances [for example, salts] could be made. 

Exceptional Performance

Pupils demonstrate both breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study when they describe and explain the nature and behaviour of materials. They use particle theory in a wider range of contexts, recognising that differences in the properties of materials relate to the nature of the particles within them. They recognise, and give explanations for, examples of chemical behaviour that do not fit expected patterns. They routinely use balanced symbol equations for reactions. They interpret quantitative data about chemical reactions, suggesting explanations for patterns identified. 

   

 


Level
 

SC4 - Physical Processes
 

3


Pupils use their knowledge and understanding of physical phenomena to link cause and effect in simple explanations [for example, a bulb failing to light because of a break in an electrical circuit, the direction or speed of movement of an object changing because of a push or a pull]. They begin to make simple generalisations about physical phenomena [for example, explaining that sounds they hear become fainter the further they are from the source]. 
 

4

Pupils demonstrate knowledge and understanding of physical processes drawn from the key stage 2 or key stage 3 programme of study. They describe and explain physical phenomena [for example, how a particular device may be connected to work in an electrical circuit, how the apparent position of the Sun changes over the course of a day]. They make generalisations about physical phenomena [for example, motion is affected by forces, including gravitational attraction, magnetic attraction and friction]. They use physical ideas to explain simple phenomena [for example, the formation of shadows, sounds being heard through a variety of materials]. 

5

Pupils demonstrate knowledge and understanding of physical processes drawn from the key stage 2 or key stage 3 programme of study. They use ideas to explain how to make a range of changes [for example, altering the current in a circuit, altering the pitch or loudness of a sound]. They use some abstract ideas in descriptions of familiar phenomena [for example, objects are seen when light from them enters the eye at key stage 2, forces are balanced when an object is stationary at key stage 3]. They use simple models to explain effects that are caused by the movement of the Earth [for example, the length of a day or year]. 

6

Pupils use and apply knowledge and understanding of physical processes drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study. They use abstract ideas in some descriptions and explanations [for example, electric current as a way of transferring energy, the sum of several forces determining changes in the direction or the speed of movement of an object, wind and waves as energy resources available for use]. They recognise, and can give examples of, the wide application of many physical concepts [for example, the transfer of energy by light, sound or electricity, the refraction and dispersion of light]. They give explanations of phenomena in which a number of factors have to be considered [for example, the relative brightness of planets and stars]. 

7

Pupils use knowledge and understanding of physical processes drawn from the key stage 3 programme of study to make links between different phenomena. They make connections between electricity and magnetism when explaining phenomena [for example, the strength of electromagnets]. They use some quantitative definitions [for example, speed, pressure] and perform calculations, using the correct units. They apply abstract ideas in explanations of a range of physical phenomena [for example, the appearance of objects in different colours of light, the relationship between the frequency of vibration and the pitch of a sound, the role of gravitational attraction in determining the motion of bodies in the solar system, the dissipation of energy during energy transfers]. 
 

8

Pupils demonstrate an extensive knowledge and understanding of the physical processes in the key stage 3 programme of study. They use models to describe and explain phenomena [for example, the magnetic field of an electromagnet, the passage of sound waves through a medium]. They use quantitative relationships between physical quantities in calculations that may involve more than one step. They offer detailed and sometimes quantitative interpretations of graphs [for example, speedtime graphs]. They consider ways of obtaining data [for example, of the solar system] and they use their knowledge of physical processes to explain patterns that they find. They consider physical phenomena from different perspectives [for example, relating the dissipation of energy during energy transfer to the need to conserve limited energy resources]. 

Exceptional Performance

Pupils demonstrate both breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding of the physical processes in the key stage 3 programme of study when they describe and explain physical phenomena. They make effective use of a range of quantitative relationships between physical quantities. They understand how models [for example, the particle model] are useful in explaining physical phenomena [for example, how sweating causes cooling]. They apply their understanding of physical phenomena to a wide range of systems [for example, recognising the role of gravitational attraction in determining the movement of satellites, planets and stars]. They recognise the importance of quantitative data and make effective use of this when they consider questions such as energy efficiency.